Skip to content

Knives With Ivory Handles

Jeanenne Bell, owner of Jewelry Box Antiques in Kansas City, Missouri, agrees that it’s best to use non-invasive tests. “You can often rely on the things God gave you to test your ivory,” she says. “You can often figure out what you have by using your hands, your eyes, and even your teeth.” The author of How to Be a Jewelry Detective says that one of the easiest ways to distinguish between ivory and plastic fakes is to pick them up. “Plastic is usually a lot lighter than the ivory,” says Jeanenne, who notes that it does take some practice to get the feel for how much a piece should weigh. “If you go to antique shops or shows and you see something that looks like ivory, ask to see it and hold it. Ask if it’s plastic or ivory. Don’t be shy.” Gloria has another trick that relies on the sense of touch: put the piece your cheek. Plastic will feel warmer than ivory.A test that Jeanenne has developed herself over the years is to tap a piece in question against the edge of her bottom row or teeth. “I can tell in two seconds what it is,” Jeanenne says. “Plastic just sounds more plasticy.”

What knife does John Wick use?
Karambit Knife: This type of knife features a curved blade and a ring on the handle for improved grip. John Wick uses this knife for grappling and close-quarters combat.
The next piece of equipment that you should use to distinguish plastic from ivory is your eyes. Jeanenne recommends you look and feel for the seam that is often detectable in a piece of molded plastic. Stuart points out that ivory also has circular rings, not unlike the rings of a tree, that can be seen with the naked eye. Gloria suggests you use a magnification loop to inspect the differences in the surface structure of plastic and ivory. Plastic is non-descript upon magnification, but you can often see cross-hatches on the surface of a piece of ivory when it’s magnified.At the Omaha ANTIQUES ROADSHOW, Stuart Whitehurst, a senior appraiser at Skinner Inc. in Boston, described an age-old test that ivory lovers have used to distinguish their ivory from plastic pretenders. The test consists of heating up the point of a needle until it’s red-hot and then pricking what you believe is your ivory carving. If the needle goes in, it’s plastic; if not, it’s probably ivory, or at least bone.

That hot pin test has been around for as long as plastic has been made to look like ivory, but there’s a problem with it: If the piece you’re poking is a piece of vintage plastic jewelry, especially a name brand, you could be damaging your piece and ruining its value. “Really, any destructive test should be the last resort, if one at all, not the first,” says Gloria Lieberman, director of fine jewelry at Skinner Boston.The last God-given gift that the Kansas City jewelry expert recommends using is your mind. “If you see what looks like ivory on a piece of costume jewelry covered with rhinestones, well, then, it’s probably plastic,” Jeanenne says. “And if it’s fine gold jewelry, it’s probably ivory.”

How can you tell if a piece is ivory?
Piece of bone it almost resembles a rotten tooth. So this is where the bone obviously contained a lot of blood vessels. And it’s marked and pitted looks like it’s gone rotten.
“If we were to do a hot-needle test on that,” said Stuart, referring to a carved plastic pig in his conversation with ANTIQUES ROADSHOW host Lara Spencer, “that needle would go right into it and make him squeal.”All the African Elephant ivory from which these Randall Made knife handles were crafted pre-dates the ivory ban of 1989. Additionally these knives, handled with pre-ban African Elephant ivory, qualify for the de minimis exemption of the current USFWS ivory restrictions and may be traded in interstate commerce. While these ivory Randall knives are completely legal it’s important to note there will be no more Elephant ivory handled Randalls crafted at the shop after July 6, 2016.

What knife does Gordon Ramsay use?
According to MasterClass, Ramsay prefers Henckels knives, which are a German style brand. As Acit Group states, German style chef’s knives are noted for their bulky blades that are tough enough to handle the likes of chicken bones owing to their extra heft.
We make every effort to mitigate the chance of ivory cracking during shipment. Once the knife is shipped we no longer have any control over it. The customer may specify by which method the knife is shipped, Ground (UPS), Air (Priority Mail) or Overnight (USPS). Extra shipping charges may be incurred for expedited shipping.Folder Knife with Fossilized Mammoth Ivory handle and high quality Made in USA AUS8 2″ stainless steel blade. 5.25″ open overall. Locking blade with thumb knob and lanyard attachment. Leather sheath available (sold separately).

Boning knives are not to be confused with filleting knives. While they both have long blades that form a tapered curve and finger guards to protect your hands from the sharp edge, the boning knife is specifically designed to maneuver around bones, slice through cartilage and ligaments, and remove skin from animals, per F.N. Sharp. This makes them a great option for hunters.
While they make separating meat from bones a breeze, a boning knife can serve more than one purpose in your kitchen. As Made-In Cookware explains, the flexibility of the blade makes a boning knife ideal for handling baked goods. They have the length and sharpness to evenly cut the layers for a cake, as well as paring knife style dexterity for shaping pastries, removing the core from cupcakes without harming the overall structure, and cutting/peeling/coring fruits. So, do yourself a favor and get rid of all the old, dull knives cluttering up your drawers, and get these four instead.One of the keys to running a successful kitchen, home or professional, is to have a stock of sharp, quality knives. Jacques Pépin has noted on several occasions that sharp knives are not only more efficient, but far safer than dull ones, via KQED. You don’t need to have a battalion of second-rate knives. Instead, keep a small number of high quality knives. They will last you far longer and serve you far better. Here are the four Ramsay recommends: chopping, paring, bread, and boning.

Despite it’s hacksaw-like appearance, a bread knife can actually perform some rather delicate tasks. Kikusumi Knives explains that bread knives are excellent option for cutting into softer desserts. Again owing to the lack of downward pressure needed to use it, the bread knife can help delicate desserts, such as a multilayered cake, maintain their structure far better than a chef’s knife or pie server.
The short blade, typically between 2.5 to 4.5 inches in length, allows for more control when performing these more detail oriented tasks. The size the paring knife directly dictates its usage. Unlike the chef’s knife, the paring knife is not an all purpose vehicle, meaning it is not the best option for cutting meat and larger root vegetables, or slicing bread.

According to Gordon Ramsay’s official website, the star chef is the holder of seven Michelin Stars, runs an international empire of restaurants, is a bestselling author and hit television presenter, manages a production studio, co-runs a charity, and has hosted not one, but two courses on MasterClass. So, when he recommends the type of kitchen knives he thinks you should own, you listen.
Bread knives are also excellent for piercing though the tough outer shell of pumpkins, squash, or pineapples, per Kikusumi. Tomatoes too, while not having rough exteriors, benefit from a serrated blade. A properly sharpened chef’s knife will slice through a tomato in a jiffy. But if you’re not regularly sharpening your knives, a bread knife is an excellent alternative that won’t completely eviscerate your tomato, according to HuffPost.

As Ramsay says, the chopping knife is excellent for, well, chopping. However, thanks to the utility of the sharp tip and double beveled blade, chopping is hardly all a chef’s knife is good for, per Made-In Cookware. The knife’s design makes it easy to rock the blade, which is perfect for dicing, mincing, and slicing everything from fruits and vegetables, to meats, nuts, and herbs.
There are several popular styles of chef’s knives. Japanese style knives, in particular, are noted for their steel quality and thiner, lightweight blades, per Acit Group. According to MasterClass, Ramsay prefers Henckels knives, which are a German style brand. As Acit Group states, German style chef’s knives are noted for their bulky blades that are tough enough to handle the likes of chicken bones owing to their extra heft. Whatever your preferred style, owning a chef’s knife is essential if you want an efficient and versatile kitchen.However, the paring knife does come in handy when it comes time to score raw meat or bread dough. According to MasterClass, to score is to cut a slash in the surface of a bread dough before baking. By scoring your loaf of bread, you allow the steam to escape during baking so the dough can expand without cracking. The same is true when scoring meat. Made-In Cookware states that the added cuts on the meats surface will help increase the Maillard reaction, giving you that great crispy sear, and allow any aromatics to marinate deeper. So keep this little knife right next to the big guy. You’ll always find use for both.These refined Laguiole en Aubrac corkscrews, featuring exquisite designs, are perfect for both personal and professional use. Effortlessly uncorking your prized wine bottles in a single fluid motion, they truly elevate the experience.The process of creating handmade Laguiole Knives is a long one, and it’s what sets Laguiole en Aubrac apart from the crowd. Made by a single craftsman these Laguiole knives carry a legacy of tradition that dates back to 1829.Choosing a personalized Laguiole en Aubrac sommelier corkscrew means adding a touch of originality to an object already known for its quality and aesthetics!

Faced with the multitude of options available on our website, it can be complex to select the ideal Laguiole. To guide you, we have developed a comprehensive and detailed analysis for each product category.
Discover our range of Laguiole en Aubrac sommelier corkscrews, essential accessories for wine lovers and oenology professionals. Each corkscrew is crafted with the same care and quality standards as the famous Laguiole en Aubrac knives.

Our selection of Laguiole en Aubrac cutlery offers a range of choices from classic to modern models, featuring various colors and original handle materials. Available in sets of 2, 4, or 6, with or without forks, as well as soup and dessert spoons. Not to mention the famous table sets.
The option of adding a unique touch to your kitchen knives through custom engraving is available, allowing you to personalize these everyday objects with elegance.Entirely hand-made from beginning to end by the same craftsman in the heart of the Laguiole region, this beautiful Laguiole en Aubrac knife is a perfect example of what a genuine French Laguiole Knife with Mammoth Ivory handle look like.

Discover the complementary cutlery range, designed to enhance your meals and offer you an unparalleled culinary experience. This refined and elegant collection includes cheese knives, oyster knives, carving sets, and many other essential accessories for a carefully set table.Laser engraving on the blade is an innovative technique that combines art and technology to enhance and personalize a knife. Choose from 6 fonts and 12 symbols. The option to add a unique touch to these knives is available through custom engraving, which is provided for you, allowing you to personalize these objects with elegance. Discover our selection of Laguiole en Aubrac folding knives, a staple of French artisanal cutlery. These high-quality pocket knives, combining elegance and practicality, are the result of traditional craftsmanship and unique expertise in knife making.Original Laguiole knife Mammoth Ivory handle entirely handmade by one of the cutlers of Laguiole en Aubrac. The spring is richly decorated with a magnificent guilloche pattern. The blade is made from corrosion resistant 12C27MOD stainless steel. The bolsters are in stainless steel. The handle features the shepherd’s cross typical of Laguiole knives.

Laguiole en Aubrac® is distinguished by the French label “Entreprise du Patrimoine Vivant“, a mark of recognition of the French State, to reward French firms for the excellence of their traditional and industrial know-how, and “Made in Aveyron” by the Aveyronnais label confirming the authentic origin in French countryside : Aveyron.
*NB: Please note that the model photo is representative but does not certify that you will have these exact veins and colors due to the 100% natural origin of the handle materials.Individually or in a set of 3, they will be useful for your cuts. Thanks to their versatility, comfort, and aestheticism, you will easily cut meat, fish, and vegetables.

Bob and his family have been carving and making knives in Alaska for over 30 years. Each year he spends a month or more in the Arctic wilderness collecting naturally shed antler for his knife handles and carvings. He gets mammoth bone from miners, and artifacts and other materials from hunters that find them while in the back country.
This pocket knife is about 2 3/4″ long when folded and just over 6 1/2″ when open. The handle is made of mammoth ivory, this is a beautiful and very durable material found by the gold miners and sold to carvers and knifemakers. It is designed and made here in Anchorage by Alaskan knife maker, Bob Merry.

Set of 12 knives ivory handle nineteenth century, Mother-of-pearl inlay, Steel cutting edge marked paris, silver ring, State of use. Specimen in accordance with regulation ec 338-97 of 09/12/1996, art. 2-w prior to 01/06/1947. Regarding the exit from the european union, the future buyer will have to inquire about the restrictions in force including those taken by france which now prohibits any re-export outside the eu.Benchmade 940-2 Osborne: This tanto knife features a durable blade and a comfortable grip. It is a versatile weapon that can be used for various tasks, from everyday carry to survival. In conclusion, John Wick knives have become a famous and iconic part of the film franchise. Whether you are a fan of the character or appreciate the design and functionality of these weapons, there is a John Wick knife out there for you. Each type offers unique features and benefits, from the butterfly knife to the karambit to the tanto. Choose the one that best suits your needs and start mastering your skills, like the legendary hitman. Karambit Knife: This type of knife features a curved blade and a ring on the handle for improved grip. John Wick uses this knife for grappling and close-quarters combat.

CRKT Homefront Hunter: A popular karambit knife, this weapon features a curved blade and a comfortable grip. It is perfect for self-defense and survival situations.
Microtech Ultratech: This famous balisong knife is known for its sharp blade and durable construction. It is a versatile weapon that can be used for various tasks.In this guide, we will dive into the world of John Wick knives, exploring the various types and their unique features. We will also provide a comprehensive overview of the most popular knives used by the legendary hitman.John Wick, a popular action movie character, has inspired a cult following and a series of films. The character’s signature style, known for his highly skilled and precise fighting, has also garnered attention for his choice of weapons, mainly his knives.

Balisong Knife: Also known as a butterfly knife, this weapon is recognizable by its two handles that rotate around the tang of the blade. John Wick uses this knife in films for quick and precise cuts.
Tanto Knife: A Japanese-style knife with a straight blade and a sharp point, this type of knife is ideal for penetration and thrusting. John Wick has been seen using this knife in films for quick and deadly strikes.The history of Micarta traces way back to 1910, invented and developed by George Westinghouse. Originally, Micarta was utilised in electronic insulations using phenolic resin. However, further development paved the way for various material applications over the years. Micarta is the original industrial knife handle material used for kitchen knives. It’s composed of soaked, heated, and laminated composite material impregnated with reinforcements.

UltreX™ Micarta® is a collection of Micarta knife handle series by Norplex Micarta. It is available in single or variations of colors. Some well-known authorized distributors of UltreX™ Micarta® are USA Knife Maker, Jantz Supply, and Isoma Europe.
As of now, Micarta is under the trademark of Norplex-Micarta, one of the leading global thermoset solution providers in the United States. Further material development allowed more reinforcement variations combined with the composite material. Consolidated with phenolic resin, melamine, or epoxy, Micarta is a rigid, durable, and aesthetic material many designers love to use worldwide.

Micarta kitchen knife handle is often compared with G10 as both use the synthetic raw material and the same set of reinforcement to create a sturdy knife handle. However, G10 comprises glass fiberglass cloth impregnated, while Micarta material can be composite linen, paper, or cotton.
Ivory is a hard, creamy-white material that forms the teeth of some mammals such as elephants, mammoths, walruses, hippos, and killer whales. Elephant tusks are mostly made up of dentine – the same material that makes up human teeth.One way of identifying whether a tusk has come from a woolly mammoth or an elephant is by cutting into it and observing the cross patterns, known as Schreger lines. The Schreger lines in mammoth tusks are usually narrower than a 90 degree angle, and wider in elephants at over 115 degrees. Image courtesy of U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service.

Where is the ivory knife handle displayed?
It is, in definitive, in tangible and summary form, the first chapter of the history of Egypt (emphasis in the original). Gebel el-Arak Knife ivory handle (back), in the Departement of Pre-Dynastic Egyptian antiquities, Louvre Museum.
Siberian locals have hurried to sites where mammoth fossils are usually found, to recover tusks that could change their lives forever – for better or worse.

Is mammoth ivory real?
Mammoth ivory is generally found during the summer months when the tundra melts. The ground then freezes over again for the rest of the year. But with global warming, more parts of permafrost are now melting to reveal ancient mammoth tusks faster than before. This has caused a ‘gold-rush’ for mammoth ivory.
‘It boils down to political will and if governments are not interested in curbing the illegal wildlife trade and don’t put it as a high priority, it’s going to be very difficult to tackle.’

The tusk collectors in Siberia are sometimes exploited, selling their tusks to these Chinese dealers at a much lower rate while the Chinese traders make the big profits in this recent rush for mammoth ivory.
Receive email updates about our news, science, exhibitions, events, products, services and fundraising activities. We may occasionally include third-party content from our corporate partners and other museums. We will not share your personal details with these third parties. You must be over the age of 13. Privacy notice.Elephant ivory has been coveted throughout history, from the Roman Empire to the modern day. The long-time use of elephant ivory means it has become intricately intertwined in some religions and cultures, including those of Indigenous communities.

Therefore, Chinese dealers have been buying mammoth tusks directly from Siberian tusk collectors and transporting them back to China without going through the legal process that comes with high tariffs.
To retrieve the tusks, a water pump is used. This often disturbs the earth in the vicinity, risking a collapse or flood at any moment. Serious injury and death are not uncommon on such jobs.

In India, people carved elephant ivory into religious statues for thousands of years. Ivory bangles worn by women were common when there were more elephants and fewer people.
Humans have coveted ivory for thousands of years, and demand eventually pushed elephants to the brink. International trade in their tusks is now banned, but a newer product on the global market could be fuelling the flames for elephants: mammoth tusks.However, when the ivory is cut into smaller pieces, it can be much harder to distinguish, making it easy to pass off illegal elephant ivory as legal mammoth tusks.

‘It’s a very caring society and I guess that’s why we, as humans are so enamoured by them because we can see ourselves in them, our good, caring and compassionate side.’
Lucy says, ‘Top master carvers usually prefer elephant ivory to mammoth as it’s more predictable. With mammoth ivory, you’re not sure if it will crumble as it’s been underground for so long.Lucy says, ‘In order to reduce the illegal ivory trade, you have to look at the demand side. China needs to concentrate on this as they’re the ones that understand their own culture. It’s not for the west to come in and tell them what to do. Elephants are the poster child for the illegal wildlife trade. It is estimated that on average, 55 African elephants per day are killed for their ivory tusks. What’s more, a lot of people do not care where the material has come from as long as it looks like ivory. This gives unscrupulous traders a reason to continue to demand elephant ivory.’It would be better if tusk hunters were incentivised to work with Russian scientists instead,’ says Lucy. ‘That way, they do not feed the black market and they could retrieve the tusks properly and carefully.

How do you authenticate ivory?
The test consists of heating up the point of a needle until it’s red-hot and then pricking what you believe is your ivory carving. If the needle goes in, it’s plastic; if not, it’s probably ivory, or at least bone.
The World Wildlife Fund (WWF) is working with customs officials and travel and tourism companies to raise awareness amongst travellers about the illegal trade and discourage them from buying ivory.Although it became illegal to sell ivory across international borders in 1990, and domestic bans came into effect in some countries several years ago, the bloody trade persists via a sophisticated black market.

What knife was made from a mammoth?
Tusker. The Spearpoint ‘Tusker’ features a durable but lightweight frame in aerospace grade titanium, inlaid with the ring-cut of a 10,000 year-old fossil Woolly Mammoth tusk. The blade is ‘Wave’ damascus with a core in extra-strong ZDP-189 steel; the one-hand button lock and the thumb stud are set with smokey quartz.
‘However, if a carver can work with the flaws and include them in the artwork, this can mean he is more skilled. And the art can be a unique piece compared to all the similar-looking ornaments that have flooded the market.’ Their bodies have been sheltered by permafrost, or permanently frozen ground. As Earth’s climate changes, these ancient giants are being revealed to the world once again. That could have an impact on their living relatives, the elephants. Wildlife crime is one of the biggest illegal businesses in the world. In a Natural History Museum podcast, discover some of the most shocking, sensational and sinister crimes committed against the natural world, and hear from the people working to end them.

A licence and increased paperwork are now required to sell mammoth ivory. When exporting to another country, the products are usually checked by authorities which can take months, and the traders lose money.But despite increased regulations in recent years, these have proved difficult to implement and the illegal trade continues to exist, including in other Asian countries such as in Laos and Vietnam, mainly for Chinese customers. Ivory items are trafficked across borders into mainland China. Since the Industrial Revolution in America, ivory has been used for all sorts of everyday items in the west, including billiard balls, piano keys and knife handles. ‘The fossils could be used for important scientific research. Perhaps they could even find other important carcasses that scientists do not usually have funds to look for, such as the woolly rhinos.’

Time is running out for elephant populations in both Africa and Asia, compounded by habitat loss and fragmentation as ever-increasing human activities expand.
In its whole form, ivory is easy to differentiate. Mammoth tusks contain a twist and curve whereas elephant tusks are straighter. Mammoth tusks also have a brown outer peel. We use cookies to give you the best online experience. We use them to improve our website and content, and to tailor our digital advertising on third-party platforms. You can change your preferences at any time. In China, elephant ivory has been considered a luxurious product since ancient times and symbolises wealth and status. The early emperors would hire skilled craftsmen to carve detailed artwork for their homes. Detailed ivory carving was a highly revered skill.An influx of mammoth ivory provides a cruelty-free alternative to elephant ivory, but it needs to be well-regulated. It comes with its own issues such as environmental damage, exploitation and fuelling the black market.

But with global warming, more parts of permafrost are now melting to reveal ancient mammoth tusks faster than before. This has caused a ‘gold-rush’ for mammoth ivory.
Lucy Vigne, an expert on the ivory trade based in Kenya and affiliated to Oxford Brookes University, says, ‘To walk or drive in an area with elephants and watch them in their natural habitats is an awe-inspiring experience.WWF is also researching consumer mentality to understand why some people continue to purchase ivory despite knowing the bloody history and risks. The aim of this fresh approach is to establish the concept that buying ivory is socially unacceptable.

Lucy says, ‘At the moment, the locals are doing their best to make money because it’s really hard to find work in that area. So they’re digging into the ground, which is dangerous for them, and not ideal for the fossils which could become damaged in the process.’
The Lancet ‘Golden Wave’ features a beautiful frame in hand carved mokume gane and sterling silver, inlaid with a mesmerizing ring section of a 10,000 year-old Woolly Mammoth tusk. The blade is ‘Wave’ damascus with a core of VG-10; the one-hand button lock and the thumb stud are set with spinel gemstones.The Monarch ‘Smoky’ features a frame in hand-forged ‘Twist’ mokume by Mike Sakmar, inlaid with a beautiful scale made from the ring-cut fossil tusk of a Woolly Mammoth that lived 10,000 years ago. The blade is William Henry’s signature ‘Wave’ damascus with a VG-10 core. The one-hand button lock and the thumb stud are set with smoky quartz gemstones.

The Spearpoint ‘Skull Ornament’ features a mesmerizing hand-engraved bolster with copper and 24K gold inlays by Gu le Sheng, inlaid with the ring-cut of a 10,000 year-old fossil Woolly Mammoth tusk. The blade is hand-forged damascus by Zoe Crist; the one-hand button lock and the thumb stud are set with spinel gem stones.The Spearpoint ‘Three Birds’ features hand-engraved bolsters with 24K gold inlays by Denny Aulia, inlaid with the ring-cut of 10,000 year-old fossil Woolly Mammoth tusk. The blade is hand-forged ‘Intrepid’ damascus by Chad Nichols; the one-hand button lock and the thumb stud are set with spinel gemstones.

The Spearpoint ‘Blue Fusion’ features a beautiful frame in hand forged ‘X-Out’ damascus by Chad Nichols. The handle is inlaid with a mesmerizing scale of ‘Mammoth Fusion’. The blade is hand-forged ‘Intrepid’ damascus by Chad Nichols; the one-hand button lock and the thumb stud are set with blue topaz gemstones.The Spearpoint ‘Cimarron’ features a mesmerizing hand-engraved bolster with copper and 24K gold inlays by David He, inlaid with the ring-cut of a 10,000 year-old fossil Woolly Mammoth tusk. The blade is hand-forged ‘Hornet’s Nest’ damascus by Mike Norris; the one-hand button lock and the thumb stud are set with spinel gem stones.

The Lancet ‘Ancient Wave’ features a beautiful frame in hand carved sterling silver, inlaid with a mesmerizing ring section of a 10,000 year-old Woolly Mammoth tusk. The blade is William Henry’s signature ‘Wave’ damascus with VG-10 core; the one-hand button lock and the thumb stud are set with sapphires.
The Omni ‘Primal’ features a frame in hand-carved sterling silver by Lee Downey, inlaid with a piece of 10,000 year-old fossil Woolly Mammoth tusk. The blade is hand-forged ‘Boomerang’ damascus, also by Chad Nichols. The ambidextrous thumb stud is inset with spinel gemstones.The Spearpoint ‘Country Roads II’ features a mesmerizing hand-engraved bolster with copper and 24K gold inlays by David He, inlaid with the ring-cut of a 10,000 year-old fossil Woolly Mammoth tusk. The blade is hand-forged ‘Boomerang’ damascus by Chad Nichols; the one-hand button lock and the thumb stud are set with spinel gem stones. The Omni ‘Blue Dawn’ features a frame in hand-forged and heat-blued ‘X-Out’ damascus by Chad Nichols, inlaid with the ring-cut of a 10,000 year-old fossil Woolly Mammoth tusk. The blade is hand-forged ‘Boomerang’ damascus, also by Chad Nichols. The ambidextrous thumb stud is inset with a smoky quartz gemstone. The Kestrel ‘Lavish’ features a beautiful frame in ‘Twist’ mokume gane by Mike Sakmar, inlaid with a ring section of a 10,000 year-old Woolly Mammoth tusk. The blade is hand-forged ‘Intrepid’ damascus by Chad Nichols; the one-hand button lock and the thumb stud are set with black onyx gemstones.

What is the most expensive knife handle?
Production cost-wise, Micarta is the most expensive knife handle material.
The woolly mammoth is the next most depicted animal in Ice Age art after horses and bisons, and these images were produced between 35 and 11.500 years ago. Today, more than five hundred depictions of woolly mammoths are known, in media ranging from carvings and cave paintings located in 46 caves in Russia, France and Spain, to sculptures and engravings made from different materials.

The Spearpoint ‘Longhorn III’ features a hand-engraved frame with 24K gold inlays by Bottega Incisioni, inlaid with a stunning piece of 10,000 year-old fossil Woolly Mammoth tusk. The blade is hand-forged ‘Hornets Nest’ damascus by Mike Norris. The one-hand button lock and the thumb stud are set with spinel gemstones.

Is mammoth ivory fossilized?
You do not have to wait for it to appreciate in history and value. When you hold a piece of mammoth ivory, you have an ancient fossil in your hands which has been preserved for thousands of years in permafrost … it’s quite mind-boggling when you think about it in those terms.
The Spearpoint ‘Sparticus’ features a mesmerizing hand-engraved bolster with copper and 24K gold inlays by David He, inlaid with the ring-cut of a 10,000 year-old fossil Woolly Mammoth tusk. The blade is custom hand-forged damascus by Zoe Crist; the one-hand button lock and the thumb stud are set with spinel gem stones. The Spearpoint ‘Wanted’ features a hand-engraved frame with 24K yellow, 18K rose, and 14K green gold, and silver and copper inlays by Hannes Glatz, inlaid with a stunning piece of 10,000 year-old fossil Woolly Mammoth tusk. The blade is hand-forged ‘Boomerang’ damascus by Chad Nichols. The one-hand button lock and the thumb stud are set with spinel gemstones. The Lancet ‘Dark Ring’ features a frame in hand-forged ‘Brain Wave’ damascus by Chad Nichols, inlaid with the ring-cut section of a 10,000 year-old fossil Woolly Mammoth tusk. The blade is ‘Wave’ damascus with a VG-10 core; the one-hand button lock and the thumb stud are set with spinel gemstones.The Lancet ‘Age Old’ features a beautiful frame in 24K gold koftgari (the ancient Indian art of inlaying gold in tool steel), inlaid with the ring-cut of a 10,000 year-old fossil Woolly Mammoth tusk. The blade is hand-forged ‘Hornets Nest’ damascus by Mike Norris; the one-hand button lock and the thumb stud are set with white topaz gemstones.The Lancet ‘Centurion’ features a beautiful hand-engraved frame with 24K gold by Tim Keough, inlaid with 10,000 year-old fossil Woolly Mammoth tusk. The blade is hand-forged ‘Hornets Nest’ damascus steel by Mike Norris; the one-hand button lock and the thumb stud are set with spinel gemstones.

The Spearpoint ‘La Catrina’ features a hand-engraved frame with 24K gold & copper inlays by Hannes Glatz, inlaid with fossil Woolly Mammoth tusk. The blade is custom hand-forged damascus by Zoe Crist. The button lock and thumb stud are set with spinel gemstones.The Lancet ‘Stone Age’ features a frame in hand-forged, heat-blued ‘Rolling Rock’ damascus by Chad Nichols, inlaid with the ring-cut section of a 10,000 year-old fossil Woolly Mammoth tusk. The blade is ‘Wave’ damascus with a VG-10 core; the one-hand button lock and the thumb stud are set with spinel gemstones. The Gentac ‘Eventide’ features a beautiful frame in hand-forged ‘Twist’ mokume gane, inlaid with bark, or outer section, of a 10,000 year-old fossil Woolly Mammoth tusk . The blade is ‘Wave’ damascus steel with a VG-10 core; the one-hand button lock and the thumb stud are set with smoky quartz gemstones. The Spearpoint ‘Grassland’ features a mesmerizing frame in 24K gold Koftgari (the ancient Indian technique of inlaying gold and/or sterling silver in tool-steel), inlaid with a stunning patchwork of 10,000 year-old fossil Woolly Mammoth tusk. The blade is hand-forged ‘Boomerang’ damascus by Chad Nichols. The one-hand button lock and the thumb stud are set with citrine gemstones.The Spearpoint ‘Scarab II’ features a stainless steel frame, hand-engraved by Tuggle Design, inlaid with multi-colored gold and blue diamonds, and scales of 10,000 year old Woolly Mammoth tusk. The blade is hand-forged ‘Barbed Wire’ damascus by Robert Eggerling; the one-hand button lock and the thumb stud are set with black diamonds.All William Henry knives feature a unique serial number which is engraved into the blade to assure the authenticity and lifetime traceability of the productThe Spearpoint ‘Horologist’ features a mesmerizing hand-engraved bolster with copper and 24K gold inlays by David He, inlaid with the ring-cut of a 10,000 year-old fossil Woolly Mammoth tusk. The blade is hand-forged ‘Boomerang’ damascus by Chad Nichols; the one-hand button lock and the thumb stud are set with spinel gem stones.

The Monarch ‘Arctic’ features a beautiful frame in hand-forged ‘Rolling Rock’ damascus by Chad Nichols, inlaid with ring-cut fossil tusk of a Woolly Mammoth that lived 10,000 years ago. The blade is hand-forged ‘Hornets Nest’ damascus by Mike Norris, and the one-hand button lock and the thumb stud are set with spinel gemstones.

The Spearpoint ‘Epic Night’ features a beautiful frame in hand-forged, etched ‘Twist’ damascus by Chad Nichols, inlaid with the ring-cut of 10,000 year-old fossil Woolly Mammoth tusk. The blade is ‘Hornets Nest’ damascus by Mike Norris; the one-hand button lock and the thumb stud are set with spinel gemstones.

What are vintage knife handles made of?
Aside from bone, similar materials like antler (deer, elk, etc.), horns (sheep, cow, buffalo, etc.) and tusks (i.e. elephant, walrus) will often be used. Of course, many like bone handles simply because of tradition. I remember my first ever knife had a jigged bone handle and it was a beautiful thing.
The Spearpoint ‘Watchmaker III’ features a hand-engraved frame with 24K gold & copper inlays by Alex Ostrogradsky, inlaid with fossil Woolly Mammoth tusk. The blade is hand-forged ‘Barbed Wire’ damascus by Robert Eggerling. The button lock and thumb stud are set with black diamonds.The Lancet ‘Ascendant’ features a beautiful frame in hand carved sterling silver, inlaid with an exterior piece of a 10,000 year-old Woolly Mammoth tusk. The blade is William Henry’s signature ‘Wave’ damascus with VG-10 core; the one-hand button lock and the thumb stud are set with smoky quartz.

The Spearpoint ‘Bark’ features a beautiful frame in hand-forged ‘Twist’ mokume gane by Mike Sakmar, inlaid with an exterior cut, or ‘bark’, of 10,000 year-old Woolly Mammoth tusk. The blade is hand-forged ‘Raindrop’ damascus by Mike Norris; the one-hand button lock and the thumb stud are set with smoky quartz gemstones.
The Tusk features gorgeous inlays crafted from wooly mammoth tusk, ranging from 6000-10000 years old. The tusk is stabilized with epoxy resin, then cross-cut to reveal the growth rings from a bygone era. This extraordinary material is set into a window in a black G10 composite handle, tough and comfortable. The blade/tang are forged from 67 layers of three alloys, with a core of VG-10 at HRC 60 for optimal sharpness and wear resistance.The Spearpoint ‘La Brea’ features a beautiful frame in hand-forged mokume gane by Mike Sakmar, inlaid with ring-cut fossil tusk of a Woolly Mammoth. The blade is hand-forged ‘Boomerang’ damascus by Chad Nichols; the one-hand button lock and the thumb stud are set with black onyx gemstones.

William Henry’s fossil Mammoth tusk is harvested in Alaska and Siberia, often from underwater. It is a rare and mesmerizing material, a living testimony of the dawn of Mankind.
The Monarch ‘Triassic’ features a beautiful frame in hand-carved sterling silver by Lee Downey, inlaid with a ring-cut section of tusk of a Woolly Mammoth that lived 10,000 years ago. The blade is ‘Intrepid’ damascus by Chad Nichols. The one-hand button lock and the thumb stud are set with white diamonds.The Spearpoint ‘Adventure’ features a beautifully unique frame in hand-forged, etched ‘T-Rex’ damascus by Delbert Ealy, a leading damascus artist. This frame has been inlaid with incredible 10,000 year-old fossil Woolly Mammoth tusk scales, and the blade is crafted from ‘Intrepid’ damascus made by another leading damascus artist, Chad Nichols. The one-hand button lock and the thumb stud are set with black onyx gemstones. A truly breathtaking William Henry knife. The Spearpoint ‘Verne’ features a hand-engraved frame with 24K gold & enamel inlays by Steve Adams, inlaid with fossil Woolly Mammoth tusk. The blade is hand-forged ‘Barbed Wire’ damascus by Robert Eggerling. The button lock and thumb stud are set with London blue topaz gemstones. The Spearpoint ‘Nautilus’ features a hand-engraved frame with 24K gold, copper & enamel inlays by Steve Adams, inlaid with fossil Woolly Mammoth tusk. The blade is hand-forged damascus by Robert Eggerling. The button lock and thumb stud are set with spinel gemstones. The Spearpoint ‘Hourglass’ features a beautiful frame in hand-carved nickel silver with watch gears, inlaid with the ring-cut of a 10,000 year-old fossil Woolly Mammoth tusk. The blade is hand-forged ‘Hornets Damascus’ by Mike Norris; the one-hand button lock and the thumb stud are set with black onyx gemstones. The Monarch ‘Reborn’ features a beautiful frame in hand-carved sterling silver, inlaid with ring-cut fossil tusk of a Woolly Mammoth that lived 10,000 years ago. The blade is in ‘Boomerang’ damascus hand forged by Chad Nichols. Hand-forged damascus blade, Kashmir blue topaz gemstones.The Kestrel ‘Tsunami’ features a beautiful frame in hand-carved sterling silver by Lee Downey, inlaid with a ring section of a 10,000 year-old Woolly Mammoth tusk. The blade is ‘Wave’ damascus with an extra-strong core in ZDP-189; the one-hand button lock and the thumb stud are set with spinel gemstones.

This knife is shipped in an elegant wood presentation box, and it includes a pocket clipcase made from soft, high-grade leather, with an integrated stainless steel pocket clip
Modern humans coexisted with woolly mammoths during the Upper Paleolithic period when they entered Europe from Africa between 30,000 and 40,000 years ago. Prior to this, Neanderthals had coexisted with mammoths during the Middle Paleolithic and up to that time. Woolly mammoths were very important to Ice Age humans, and their survival may have depended on these animals in some areas.The Spearpoint ‘Scarab’ features a stainless steel frame, hand-engraved by Tuggle Design, inlaid with 24K gold and Mozambique garnets and scales of 10,000 year old Woolly Mammoth tusk. The blade is hand-forged ‘Barbed Wire’ damascus by Robert Eggerling; the one-hand button lock and the thumb stud are set with spinel gemstones.

The Spearpoint ‘Thicket’ features a hand-engraved frame with 24K gold inlays by Lucie Bandikova, inlaid with a stunning piece of 10,000 year-old fossil Woolly Mammoth tusk. The blade is hand-forged ‘Hornets Nest’ damascus by Mike Norris. The one-hand button lock and the thumb stud are set with spinel gemstones.

This knife is shipped in an elegant wood presentation box, and it comes with a pocket clipcase made from soft, high-grade leather, with an integrated stainless steel pocket clip

The Spearpoint ‘Oni’ features hand-engraved bolsters with 22K and 24K yellow gold, 18K green gold, and copper inlays by Tyler Prince, inlaid with the ring-cut of 10,000 year-old fossil Woolly Mammoth tusk. The blade is hand-forged ‘Intrepid’ damascus by Chad Nichols; the one-hand button lock and the thumb stud are set with spinel gemstones.
The Spearpoint ‘Last Tango’ features mesmerizing hand-engraved stainless steel bolsters with inlaid copper and 24K gold by Gabriele Perticaroli, inlaid with a stunning piece of 10,000 year-old fossil Woolly Mammoth tusk. The blade is hand-forged ‘Intrepid’ damascus by Chad Nichols; the one-hand button lock and the thumb stud are set with spinel gemstones.The Spearpoint ‘Tundra II’ features a mesmerizing frame in 24K gold Koftgari (the ancient Indian technique of inlaying gold and/or sterling silver in tool-steel), inlaid with the ring-cut of a 10,000 year-old fossil Woolly Mammoth tusk. The blade is our signature ‘Wave’ damascus with a VG-10 core. The one-hand button lock and the thumb stud are set with spinel gemstones. The Spearpoint ‘Adventure II’ features a beautifully unique frame in hand-forged, etched ‘T-Rex’ damascus by Delbert Ealy, a leading damascus artist. This frame has been inlaid with incredible 10,000 year-old fossil Woolly Mammoth tusk scales, and the blade is William Henry’s ‘Wave’ damascus with an extra sharp core of VG10. The one-hand button lock and the thumb stud are set with spinel gemstones. A truly breathtaking William Henry knife. The Spearpoint ‘Crusaders’ features a mesmerizing hand-engraved bolster with copper and 24K gold inlays by David He, inlaid with the ring-cut of a 10,000 year-old fossil Woolly Mammoth tusk. The blade is ‘Cosmic’ damascus, hand-forged with Gibeon Meteorite and other steels by Chad Nichols; the one-hand button lock and the thumb stud are set with spinel gem stones.