Skip to content

Vicky Hartzler Net Worth

Dating is to describe a stage in a person’s life when he or she is actively pursuing romantic relationships with different people. If two unmarried celebrities are seen in public together, they are often described as “dating” which means they were seen in public together, and it is not clear whether they are merely friends, exploring a more intimate relationship, or are romantically involved.

On Popular Bio, She is one of the successful Politician. She has ranked on the list of those famous people who were born on October 13, 1960. She is one of the Richest Politician who was born in United States. She also has a position among the list of Most popular Politician. Vicky Hartzler is 1 of the famous people in our database with the age of 59 years old.
Vicky Hartzler keeps his personal and love life private. Check back often as we will continue to update this page with new relationship details. Let’s take a look at Vicky Hartzler past relationships, ex-girlfriends and previous hookups. Vicky Hartzler prefers not to tell the details of marital status & divorce.According to Wikipedia, Forbes, IMDb & Various Online resources, famous Politician Vicky Hartzler’s net worth is $1-5 Million at the age of 59 years old. She earned the money being a professional Politician. She is from United States.

Vicky Hartzler estimated Net Worth, Salary, Income, Cars, Lifestyles & many more details have been updated below. Let’s check, How Rich is Vicky Hartzler in 2019-2020?Vicky Hartzler current age 59 years old. Vicky Hartzler’s height Unknown & weight Not Available right. Full body measurements, dress & shoe size will be updated soon.

Hartzler is an example. She had the highest asset income of all candidates, according to the latest reports available, and a large increase from the previous year.
Among the Democrats who have reported, Toder has the highest-valued assets. They are listed on a report filed March 3 at $3.7 million to $6 million, but in a statement to The Independent, he said that overstated his share of the investments and he will be amending the report. Valentine filed March 28 for the seat being vacated by Sen. Roy Blunt. Under federal law, candidates must file disclosures within 30 days of becoming a candidate, or May 15, whichever is later in the year, unless an extension is granted. Greitens reported assets valued from $880,000 to $1.35 million, with income from investments of $200,000 to $2 million for 2020 in a report filed in December. He reported dividends, interest and capital gains between $100,000 and $1 million on an account with USAA and dividends from $100,000 to $1 million from Eric Greitens LLC. Greitens also reported earned income $159,233, with $134,477 from self employment at Eric Greitens LLC.Other candidates have tapped their personal wealth, such as when Missouri Senate President Pro Tem Dave Schatz made a $1 million loan to his campaign for the Republican nomination.

In 2020, Forbes estimated the Busch family fortune at $17.6 billion. No individual members of the Busch family are on the Forbes 400 list of wealthiest Americans, where the smallest fortune is $2.9 billion.
His business, along with his real estate and stocks investments, were valued between $4.5 million and $15.3 million. Schatz reported investment income between $200,000 and $443,000 and earned income, including his Senate salary, of $224,029.Other candidates have previously been granted extensions. Republican Attorney General Eric Schmitt, for example, filed Tuesday for an extension for what will be his second disclosure report and also received an extension for his initial filing last year.

“This program has helped employees keep food on the table, pay their rent, and meet their car payments. The program protects paychecks across the state, including employees at the small business owned by my husband and me,” Hartzler said in a 2020 statement to the Kansas City Star.
The money he has put into his own campaign, Toder said, has helped him put focus on Medicaid access and the wrongly incarcerated as well as build the Democratic Party.“I will continue to contribute funds, as necessary, because I believe that a Senator should take action and that the role of a campaign is to exhibit a candidate’s values and support of their community,” he wrote.

Disclosure reports list a candidates’ family income, investments and liabilities for the previous year. It must include assets and the income of spouses and dependent children.
Asset values, and the income generated, is reported in ranges. And because the ranges expand as the numbers get larger, it can make what may be a small increase look much larger because it crosses a threshold amount.

Schatz, who owns an underground telecommunications contracting company as well as real estate and securities, said it is time consuming to unravel complex personal finances to meet reporting requirements. He was granted a 90-day extension in December for his initial filing, which was submitted March 31.House members – and candidates – file their disclosures with the House Clerk’s Office. For House members seeking Senate seats – like Long and Hartzler – disclosure as House incumbents complies with the legal requirements for disclosure as Senate candidates.Our stories may be republished online or in print under Creative Commons license CC BY-NC-ND 4.0. We ask that you edit only for style or to shorten, provide proper attribution and link to our web site.

There are 21 Republicans and 11 Democrats contesting the primaries. Six candidates from the Republican field — Greitens, Hartzler, Long, Schatz, Schmitt and St. Louis attorney Mark McCloskey — have filed disclosures, as have three from the Democratic field – Toder, Air Force veteran Jewel Kelly and Marine veteran Lucas Kunce.
In an interview with The Independent, Busch Valentine said she wants “everybody to live the American dream. And I’m investing in my campaign because it’s that important to me.”

“I am a shareholder in several illiquid assets, largely as an angel investor in Missouri-based startups that are not easily valued,” Toder wrote in an email. “The filing listed the approximate value of those entities, as a whole in some places, rather than the estimated value of my shares in those companies.” Missouri Independent is part of States Newsroom, a network of news bureaus supported by grants and a coalition of donors as a 501c(3) public charity. Missouri Independent maintains editorial independence. Contact Editor Jason Hancock for questions: [email protected]. Follow Missouri Independent on Facebook and Twitter. “The people of Missouri deserve to know a lot about Ms. Valentine — not only in regards to her finances, but in regards to her policies and her qualifications to represent our state,” he wrote.“Those things are pretty hard to put together and once you do it two or three times, you kind of get a system going,” Long said. “It is pretty daunting. One time my accountant spent a half a day looking for a $4 stock.”There are several millionaires seeking Missouri’s open U.S. Senate seat, financial disclosure reports show. But voters won’t see the finances of the only likely billionaire in the race until July.The disclosure report did not include two Paycheck Protection Loans received by Hartzler’s business interests in 2020. Heartland Tractor in Harrisonville received a $451,200 loan and Hartzler Farms received a $26,900 loan, both on April 5, 2020. The loans were both forgiven on Dec. 23, 2020.

But Valentine will be the last candidate to file at least one disclosure report, delaying until July 3 when voters will get a glimpse into her potential to self fund her campaign. An extension can be for up to 90 days, but it is due on that date because it must be submitted at least 30 days before the Aug. 2 primary.
Hartzler owns farms, a farm equipment business and other investments valued from $4.7 million to $16.1 million jointly with her husband Lowell Hartzler. In 2020, those assets generated between $1.1 million and $5.2 million, according to a report filed in August 2021.

Extensions are granted as a matter of routine when requested. Former Gov. Eric Greitens received one last year, and U.S. Rep. Vicky Hartzler has used extensions to complete her reports for most years since she ran for Congress in 2010.The Missouri Independent is a nonprofit, nonpartisan news organization dedicated to relentless investigative journalism and daily reporting that sheds light on state government and its impact on the lives of Missourians. This service is free to readers and other news outlets.

Hartzler’s asset income range increased greatly from 2019, when it was $227,000 to $1.3 million. The largest difference was the income from Heartland Tractor, the equipment business. She reported income between $100,000 and $1 million from the company in 2017, 2018 and 2019. The next step is the range $1 million to $5 million, which she reported for 2020.
Trudy Busch Valentine, a Democrat and Anheuser Busch beer heiress who jumped into the race during the final days of filing, on Monday filed for a 48-day extension of the May 15 deadline for reporting her personal financial data. “For a guy that drove off to auction school in 1979 with an old Oldsmobile with four bald tires, it was a pretty good run,” Long said of his lifetime of work. Rudi Keller covers the state budget and the legislature. A graduate of the University of Missouri School of Journalism, he spent 22 of his 32 years in journalism covering Missouri government and politics for the Columbia Daily Tribune, where he won awards for spot news and investigative reporting.

Long said he, too, understands the extension request. He has received extensions in each of the past two years for his House disclosures, but those were automatic because of the COVID-19 pandemic.
The wealthiest Republican candidate, according to a review of the latest reports, is McCloskey. The lowest accounting of his assets from the disclosure filed April 6 is $5.9 million, with a high end of $22 million, including residential properties valued at $1.5 million to $6 million and personal property valued $1 million to $5 million.Only candidates who meet fundraising thresholds requiring them to report campaign finances to the Federal Election Commission are required to report. Senate candidates file their reports with the Senate Ethics Committee, which makes them available online. U.S. Rep. Billy Long put $250,000 into his GOP primary campaign, and St. Louis businessman Spencer Toder has used $240,000 of his own money for his effort in the Democratic primary. Our stories may be republished online or in print under Creative Commons license CC BY-NC-ND 4.0. We ask that you edit only for style or to shorten, provide proper attribution and link to our web site. Please see our republishing guidelines for use of photos and graphics.Valentine asked for the extension because of the complexity of her finances, her campaign said in a response to inquiries from The Independent. It is not as simple as taking numbers from a tax return, the campaign stated, because it needs to precisely state each investment and how to place its value in the mandated ranges. “In this race, we expect all candidates in both parties to be transparent with the voters about their personal wealth as well as any corporate and special interest groups guiding their decision making,” he wrote. Schmitt’s 2021 filing listed assets valued from $384,000 to $1 million in 2020, investment income of less than $7,000 and earned income of $184,538, mostly his state salary. Kelly earned $333,534 as director of service for GE Healthcare in St. Louis and from real estate commissions, according to a report filed in March. He reported no investment or other assets. Long, who was an auctioneer and sold real estate before winning his 7th District seat in Congress, has assets valued from $2 million to $4.6 million, generating $15,000 to $42,000 in income in 2020, according to his report filed in August. He also earned $28,965 in residual real estate commissions from sales before he took office. I write about the world’s richest people and their businesses. I am a CPA and former Big Four financial statement auditor. I graduated from Miami University (OH) with a B.S. and M.S. in Accounting. I recently completed an M.S. in Journalism at Columbia University with an investigative journalism focus. I am a Chicago native living in New York City. Follow me on Twitter @DurotMatthew or email me at mdurotATforbes.com. Methodology: Forbes reviewed second quarter candidate committee records filed with the Federal Election Commission in July, as well as recent leadership PAC records, and counted contributions of $500 and more made to committees. Some contributions were labeled in committee records as transfers from other joint-fundraising committees.

Money manager Cliff Asness was so outraged by the events of January 6 that he tweeted in support of Trump’s impeachment. Nonetheless, he and his wife recently contributed to Bice, Malliotakis and Beth Van Duyne, who all refused to certify Biden’s victory. In May, Dallas billionaire Kenny Troutt gave money to two Texas congressman who objected to certifying the election. A representative for Troutt said that “nothing about the vote” was relevant to Troutt’s decision to donate to those lawmakers. California tech billionaire Jack Dangermond, who founded mapping software firm Esri, donated to Joe Biden’s 2020 campaign before giving to two representatives who did not certify the win.
In January, 147 lawmakers in Congress voted against certifying the 2020 presidential election results. Above, legislators meet to count the Electoral College vote from the 2008 presidential election in January 2009.

I took an unusual route to get here. In a past life, I worked as a travel and food writer, which is how I got the assignment in 2016 to cover the grand opening of the Trump International Hotel in Washington, D.C., just a couple miles from my home. When Trump won the election and refused to divest his business, I stayed on the story, starting a newsletter called 1100 Pennsylvania (named after the hotel’s address) and contributed to Vanity Fair, Politico and NBC News. I’m still interested in Trump, but I’ve broadened my focus to follow the money connected to other politicians as well—both Republicans and Democrats.
When asked for comment on their contributions, most billionaires did not respond. Two Minnesotans, hearing-aid tycoon Bill Austin and media mogul Stanley Hubbard defended their gifts to Representatives Jim Hagedorn and Michelle Fischbach. In a statement, Hubbard said that he and his wife do not agree with the votes against certifying the presidential election but do “respect the other good work Representatives Hagedorn and Fischbach do.” Austin expressed a similar sentiment. “We unequivocally denounce the actions of the criminals who stormed the Capitol and put lawmakers, law enforcement and Americans at risk,” he said in a statement. “It has always been important to us to be involved in the democratic process, and that is why we make personal donations to political groups and support lawmakers in both parties.”

The biggest beneficiary among this group was McCarthy, who is in the process of forming a committee to investigate the January 6 attacks on the Capitol. For the billionaires, their contributions amounted to pocket change. Candidate committees cannot accept contributions of more than $2,900 per election, and leadership PACs can’t take more than $5,000 per year.
I’m a Staff Writer on the Wealth team at Forbes, covering billionaires and their wealth. My reporting has led me to an S&P 500 tech firm in the plains of Oklahoma; a fighter-jet-flying payments entrepreneur in New Jersey; a family-owned firm making insulin pens and vials for Covid-19 vaccines in northern Italy; and many more stories across the U.S. and the world. See my work here and on Twitter @giacomotognini and on LinkedIn @giacomotognini. Tips: [email protected] York City billionaire John Catsimatidis defended his decision to contribute to Rep. McCarthy and Senator John Kennedy of Louisiana. “I give to common sense Republicans as well as common sense Democrats,” Catsimatidis wrote in an email. “Trying to relate my contribution to January 6 is not being realistic. It has nothing to do with it.”Among the donors: former UFC owners Lorenzo and Frank Fertitta, oil baron Ray Lee Hunt and PayPal cofounder Peter Thiel. In total, the benefactors along with their spouses contributed about $1 million to the committees of roughly one-third of the 147 representatives and senators who objected to certifying the election.About 60% of the donors also contributed to Donald Trump’s reelection campaign. Roughly 20% live in Texas, and nearly 30% built their fortunes in finance.

According to a spokesperson for House Minority Leader Kevin McCarthy, that committee shuttles donations to House Republicans who received less than 56% of the vote in 2020, or who received an average of less than 56% of votes for the last two election cycles. Take Back The House is funding more than 50 House Republicans. Typically, donors do not have a say where their contributions go once they’ve sent their money to a joint-fundraising committee. Instead, it’s all divvied up according to a preset formula.
About half of the money came from just seven donors: the Fertittas and their spouses, Hilcorp Energy CEO Jeff Hildebrand, Franklin Resources shareholder Charles Johnson, and the wife of Charles Schwab, Helen. All of them made six-figure contributions this year to a joint-fundraising committee called Take Back The House 2022.

I cover the most successful entrepreneurs doing the biggest deals on the planet. As a senior editor, I help put together the Forbes 400 and World’s Billionaires lists and oversee Forbes’ coverage of billionaires. My reporting has taken me everywhere from the world’s largest cardboard box factory to Donald Trump’s penthouse. Email me at [email protected].
In 2019, Hartzler sponsored an event by proponents of conversion therapy in order to provide congressional office space, for which she was rebuked by Representative Ted Lieu, whose office was next to the event, and who sponsored legislation to ban conversion therapy. Hartzler supported the Trump administration’s call to require the government to purchase only medical equipment and pharmaceuticals made in the United States. In 2019, she and Representative John Garamendi introduced legislation to require the Department of Defense to “identify vulnerabilities faced by our country’s dependence on Chinese pharmaceuticals, and to only purchase American-made raw materials, medicines, and vaccines for the military.” In July 2020, Hartzler and Garamendi announced provisions of the legislation were ultimately rolled in the broader National Defense Authorization Act, which passed the House of Representatives on July 21, 2020. As a member of the House Armed Services Committee, Hartzler supports increasing military spending, saying, “[i]n order to maintain our competitive advantage in the era of great power competition, we must modernize our forces.”

Hartzler was raised on a farm near Archie, a rural community south of Kansas City. She graduated from Archie High School and later attended the University of Missouri, where she graduated summa cum laude with a B.S. in education, and the University of Central Missouri, where she graduated with an M.S. in education.After almost a decade out of politics, Hartzler entered the Republican primary for Missouri’s 4th congressional district, which at the time was held by 17-term Democratic incumbent Ike Skelton. She won a seven-way primary with 40% of the vote.

Hartzler has supported investment in rural broadband, which falls under the jurisdiction of the House Agriculture Committee. She successfully led provisions Trump signed into law to increase private investment in rural broadband, modifying Rural Utilities Service broadband programs to include loan guarantees in addition to existing direct loans. She also successfully led provisions to increase minimum download speeds from 4 to 25 megabits per second, with minimum upload speed tripling to 3 Mbps for companies receiving financing from the Department of Agriculture’s Rural Utilities Service fund. In 2020, Hartzler introduced legislation to allow certain Rural Utilities Service borrowers to take advantage of low interest rates without heavy fines and penalties in the aftermath of the COVID-19 pandemic.Hartzler won the November 2 general election with 50.43% of the vote. She is the first Republican to represent the district since 1955, and only the second since the Great Depression. She was also the second Republican woman elected to Congress from Missouri, after Jo Ann Emerson, with whom she served from 2011 to 2013. She is the first who was not elected as a stand-in for her husband; Emerson was originally elected to serve out the final term of her late husband, Bill Emerson. Republicans had been making gains in the district for some time; it gave John McCain 62% of the vote in 2008 while simultaneously reelecting Skelton, and Republicans hold most of the district’s seats in the state legislature. While Skelton more than held his own in the areas of the district closer to Kansas City, Hartzler swamped him in the more rural areas, including areas that had supported him for over 30 years.

Hartzler was one of the 139 Republican representatives who voted against certifying the results of the 2020 presidential election in Congress at the 2021 United States Electoral College vote count.
As a senior member of the House Agriculture Committee, Hartzler served as a conferee to pass the final version of the Farm Bill in 2018. Hartzler did not vote on the measure to pass the Farm Bill due to her father passing away in December 2018. President Donald Trump signed the final version of the Farm Bill in December 2018. In September 2013, Hartzler voted for a $39 billion reduction in Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program benefits, which was separated from legislation to increase farm subsidies for the first time in over three decades. In her first contest in the newly drawn district, Hartzler easily won the Republican primary with 84% of the vote against Bernie Mowinski and went on to win the general election with 60.3% against the Democratic nominee, Cass County Prosecuting Attorney Teresa Hensley.Hartzler lives on a farm near Harrisonville with her family. She is an Evangelical Christian. She co-owns the Hartzler Equipment Company, later renamed Heartland Tractor, and Hartzler Farms Inc. with her husband and other members of the Hartzler family.

Hartzler opposes abortion. She has sponsored legislation in an effort to block taxpayer dollars from funding clinics that offer abortion services, such as Planned Parenthood, as well as legislation such as the Pain-Capable Unborn Child Protection Act.
On June 29, 2017, Hartzler opposed allowing transgender Americans to serve in the U.S. armed forces, and proposed an amendment to the National Defense Authorization Act for Fiscal Year 2018 to reverse an Obama administration policy that allowed transgender Americans in the armed services. Her amendment was rejected in a 209–214 vote, but Trump subsequently announced that he would ban transgender people to serve in U.S. military; Hartzler said that she was “very pleased” by the decision.

In March 2022, Hartzler’s Twitter account was briefly suspended after tweeting, “Women’s sports are for women, not men pretending to be women”, in reference to transgender swimmer Lia Thomas.
On December 8, 2022, Hartzler broke into tears as she called on her colleagues in the U.S. House of Representatives to oppose the Respect for Marriage Act, which would protect the legal status of same-sex and interracial marriage.During her first term, Hartzler represented a district that stretched as far east as the state capital, Jefferson City, and as far west as exurban areas of Jackson County. Redistricting after the 2010 U.S. Census removed Cole, Lafayette, Ray and Saline counties—including Skelton’s home. The district also lost its shares of Jackson and Webster counties. In its place, the district picked up all of Boone, Cooper, Howard, and Randolph counties, part of Audrain County, and the remainder of Cass County. The district now includes Cass County’s portion of Kansas City. Hartzler’s district comprised a large swath of western-central Missouri, anchored in Columbia and stretching to the eastern and southern Kansas City suburbs, including a sliver of Kansas City. The district also included Sedalia, Warrensburg, Moberly, and Lebanon. Hartzler opposes same-sex marriage, civil unions, and domestic partnerships. She also opposes banning discrimination based on sexual orientation and gender identity. In 2019, Hartzler expressed her strong opposition to the Equality Act. She has written an op-ed rejecting it. She also opposes allowing transgender individuals to serve in the military.On July 17, 2020, days after the announcement of sanctions against U.S. lawmakers by China, Hartzler wrote a Fox News op-ed expressing support for the Trump administration’s sanctions on China and calling for the international community to impose similar sanctions. She also called on lawmakers to “expose U.S. companies complicit” in profiting from alleged slave labor in Xinjiang reeducation camps.

As a member of the Congressional-Executive Commission on China, Hartzler was sanctioned by the Chinese government along with other prominent members of the federal government, including Senator Marco Rubio, Senator Ted Cruz, and Secretary of State Mike Pompeo. The sanctions against Hartzler and her colleagues came after Pompeo and the United States Department of Treasury sanctioned four Chinese officials for their involvement in alleged human rights abuses in Xinjiang against the Uyghur Muslim population.

In January 2017, Hartzler made a statement supporting Trump’s ban on immigrants from seven Muslim countries and halting the U.S. Refugee program for 120 days. In her statement, Hartzler said Trump’s executive order and Obama’s 2011 policy that slowed immigration from Iraq were “similar”.
Hartzler rejects the scientific consensus on climate change. On November 18, 2014, during the worst early season cold snap in the U.S. since 1976, Hartzler made a joke about climate change on Twitter. “Global warming strikes America! Brrrr!” The quip was rebutted in detail by The Washington Post, which reported that her district in Missouri is among the areas most severely impacted by climate change in the United States.She left the Missouri House of Representatives in 2000 after adopting a baby daughter. In 2004, Hartzler served as state spokeswoman for the Coalition to Protect Marriage, which supported banning same-sex marriage in Missouri. In 2000, Hartzler opposed the Missouri Assembly’s ratification of the Equal Rights Amendment (ERA) and led a group of legislators in a rally against the ERA, saying she didn’t “want women used to pass a liberal agenda”. In 2005, Governor Matt Blunt appointed Hartzler chair of the Missouri Women’s Council, where she served for two years. During the COVID-19 pandemic, Hartzler’s business, Heartland Tractor Company in Harrisonville, Missouri, received a loan of over $450,000 as part of the Paycheck Protection Program (PPP); the loan was later forgiven. Hartzler voted against the TRUTH Act (H.R. 6782), a bill that would have required public disclosure of companies that received funds through the program. On December 10, 2020, Hartzler was one of 126 Republican members of the U.S. House of Representatives to sign an amicus brief in support of Texas v. Pennsylvania, a lawsuit filed at the United States Supreme Court contesting the results of the 2020 presidential election. The Supreme Court declined to hear the case on the basis that Texas lacked standing under Article III of the Constitution to challenge the results of an election held by another state. House Speaker Nancy Pelosi issued a statement that called signing the amicus brief an act of election subversion.

U.S. Senator Josh Hawley endorsed Hartzler in February 2022. According to Politico, “His choice generated hard feelings among other contenders for the Senate nomination—in addition to raising eyebrows in Trump World. Of all the candidates in the field, Hartzler has done the least public pandering to win the former president’s support.” On July 8, 2022, Donald Trump refused to endorse Hartzler, saying, “I don’t think she has what it takes to take on the Radical Left Democrats.” Hartzler lost the August 2 Republican primary to Missouri Attorney General Eric Schmitt, receiving 22% of the vote to Schmitt’s 46%.
In February 2022, Hartzler’s campaign released a 30-second ad criticizing Lia Thomas, a transgender swimmer on the University of Pennsylvania women’s team. In the ad, Hartzler said, “Women’s sports are for women, not men pretending to be women”, adding that, as Missouri’s senator, she would not “look away while woke liberals destroy women’s sports.”

Vicky Jo Hartzler (née Zellmer; born October 13, 1960) is an American politician who served as the U.S. representative for Missouri’s 4th congressional district from 2011 to 2023. A member of the Republican Party, she served as the Missouri state representative for the 124th district from 1995 to 2000.Throughout her tenure in the committee, Hartzler has served as a conferee in the legislative process to pass the National Defense Authorization Act, all of which the president has signed into law. She has led initiatives to fully fund the B-21 long range strike bomber program and modernization programs of the Northrop Grumman B-2 Spirit based at Whiteman Air Force Base. She has also successfully advocated for funding for the maintenance and modifications to the A-10 Thunderbolt II program and funding for the F-15EX program based in Missouri, the F-18 Super Hornet program, and the T-7A Advanced Trainer program. Hartzler has also successfully advocated for funding of the Fort Leonard Wood hospital replacement project and a partial dislocation allowance for service members forced to move from dormitories.

The Congressional-Executive Commission on China (CECC) is an independent agency of the U.S. government which monitors human rights and rule of law developments in the People’s Republic of China. It was created in October 2001 under Title III of H.R. 4444, which authorizes normal trade relations with the PRC, and establishes a framework for relations between the two countries. The commission was given the mandate by the U.S. Congress to monitor and report on human rights issues with a particular focus on compliance with the International Covenant on Civil and Political Rights and the Universal Declaration of Human Rights. Its reporting covers developments in freedom of expression, the right to peaceful assembly, religious freedom, freedom of movement, freedom from arbitrary arrest, detention, or torture, and the right to a fair trial, among others. The commission publishes an annual report to the President of the United States and Congress, typically in the fall of each year. It also maintains a database of prisoners of conscience, holds regular roundtables and hearings, and issues letters to other institutions concerning human rights matters.
Vicky Hartzler (Vicky Jo Zellmer) was born on 13 October, 1960 in Archie, Missouri, United States, is an American politician. Discover Vicky Hartzler’s Biography, Age, Height, Physical Stats, Dating/Affairs, Family and career updates. Learn How rich is She in this year and how She spends money? Also learn how She earned most of networth at the age of 62 years old?Hartzler lives on a farm near Harrisonville with her family. According to publicly available data reviewed by the Kansas City Star, Hartzler, with her family farm, has been one of the biggest beneficiaries of federal farm subsidies out of all members of Congress, receiving $995,498 between 1995 and 2016.

At 62 years old, Vicky Hartzler height not available right now. We will update Vicky Hartzler’s Height, weight, Body Measurements, Eye Color, Hair Color, Shoe & Dress size soon as possible.
Her accomplishments included leadership on legislation facilitating the adoption process. Hartzler left the Missouri House of Representatives in 2000 after adopting a baby daughter. In 2004, after she had left the Missouri General Assembly, Hartzler served as state spokeswoman for the Coalition to Protect Marriage, which supported banning same-sex marriage in Missouri. Despite her opposition to the Missouri Assembly’s ratification of the Equal Rights Amendment (“I don’t want women used to pass a liberal agenda”), Republican Governor Matt Blunt appointed Hartzler Chairwoman of the Missouri Women’s Council in 2005, where she served for two years.Hartzler strongly opposes same-sex marriage, civil unions, and domestic partnerships. She also opposes banning discrimination based on sexual orientation and gender identity. In 2019, Hartzler expressed her strong opposition to the Equality Act. She also opposes allowing transgender individuals to serve in the military. Also in 2019, Hartzler sponsored an event by proponents of conversion therapy in order to provide the use of Congressional office space, inviting a rebuke from Rep. Ted Lieu, whose office was next to the event, and who sponsored legislation which would ban conversion therapy.

Her net worth has been growing significantly in 2022-2023. So, how much is Vicky Hartzler worth at the age of 62 years old? Vicky Hartzler’s income source is mostly from being a successful Politician. She is from United States. We have estimated Vicky Hartzler’s net worth , money, salary, income, and assets.
A complaint was filed against Hartzler’s office stating a tweet from her Congressional account displaying Case IH’s products violated congressional ethics rules. The products are sold at Hartzler’s personal business, Heartland Tractor Company. The House Ethics Committee has acknowledged receipt of the complaint but has not pursued any sanctions against the office.In February 2016, during a trip to Israel, Hartzler voiced her support for the country and shared the belief that “our country has been blessed because we have been a blessing to Israel”.

In January 2017, Hartzler made a statement supporting President Donald J Trump’s ban on immigrants from seven Muslim countries and halting the U.S. Refugee program for 120 days. In her statement, Hartzler drew equivalency between Trump’s executive order and Obama’s 2011 policy that slowed immigration from Iraq by saying they were “similar”.
Hartzler, with her family farm, has been one of the biggest beneficiaries of federal farm subsidies out of all members of Congress. Hartzler Farms Inc received payments totaling $1,174,403 from 1995 through 2019After almost a decade out of politics, Hartzler entered the Republican primary for Missouri’s 4th congressional district , which at the time was held by 17-term Democratic incumbent Ike Skelton. She won a seven-way primary with 40 percent of the vote.Before running for State Representative in 1994, Hartzler taught high school home economics (now commonly referred to as family and consumer sciences) for 11 years.Vicky Jo Hartzler (née Zellmer, October 13, 1960) is an American politician serving as the U.S. Representative for Missouri’s 4th congressional district since 2011. A member of the Republican Party, she previously served as the Missouri State Representative for the 124th district from 1995 to 2000.

Since the 115th Congress, Hartzler has served as the Chairwoman of the Value Actions Team (VAT). VAT is a conservative group of lawmakers with a stated mission of advancing legislation on the principals of “traditional values”, including pro-life and religious freedom legislation.
On June 29, 2017 Hartzler opposed allowing transgender Americans to serve in the U.S. armed forces, and proposed an amendment to the National Defense Authorization Act for Fiscal Year 2018 to reverse an Obama-administration policy that allowed transgender Americans in the armed services. Hartzler’s amendment was rejected in a 209–214 vote, but Trump subsequently announced that he would ban transgender people to serve in U.S. military; Hartzler said that she was “very pleased” with the decision.In the November 2, 2010 general election, Hartzler won with 50.43% of the vote. She is the first Republican to represent this district since 1955, and only the second since the Great Depression. She was also the second Republican woman elected to Congress from Missouri, after Jo Ann Emerson, with whom she served from 2011 to 2013. However, she is the first who was not elected as a stand-in for her husband; Emerson was originally elected to serve out the final term of her late husband, Bill Emerson. Republicans had been making gains in the district for some time; it gave John McCain 62 percent of the vote in 2008 while simultaneously reelecting Skelton, and Republicans hold most of the district’s seats in the state legislature. She won primarily by running up her totals in the more rural areas of the sprawling district. In September 2013, Hartzler voted in favor of a $39 billion reduction in Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program (SNAP) Benefits (aka “food stamps”). The SNAP Benefits legislation was separated from legislation to increase farm subsidies for the first time in over three decades. In 2018, Hartzler again supported a farm subsidy bill while advocating for additional restrictions for Food Stamp recipients Discover today’s celebrity birthdays and explore famous people who share your birthday. View popular celebrities life details, birth signs and real ages.Redistricting after the 2010 U.S. Census removed Cole, Lafayette, Ray and Saline counties—including Skelton’s home. The district also lost its shares of Jackson and Webster counties. In its place, the district picked up all of Boone, Cooper, Howard, and Randolph counties, part of Audrain County, and the remainder of Cass County. The district now includes the Cass County portion of Kansas City. The new map also pushed the district further into Camden County.

Hartzler will face John Brinkmann, former Missouri Gov. Eric Greitens, U.S. Rep. Billy Long, Mark McCloskey, Deshon Porter, Dave Schatz, Missouri Attorney General Eric Schmitt and Dave Sims in the Republican primary in August.

Social media company Twitter has suspended Congresswoman Vicky Hartzler’s personal account after a tweet that read “Women’s sports are for women, not men pretending to be women,” and included her television ad.

“Twitter believes the bigger threat is a senior member of the House Armed Services Committee saying women’s sports are for women. It’s shameful, utterly ridiculous, and a horrible abuse of censorship by big tech giants to stifle free speech,” Hartzler’s campaign said in a statement.Twitter accounts can be banned for multiple reasons including account security at risk, spam and abusive tweets or behavior which breaks the “Twitter Rules.”

According to an email sent to the campaign from Twitter, Hartzler must delete the tweet and wait twelve hours before Twitter will allow the account to tweet, retweet, follow or like posts on Twitter again. The campaign says Hartzler will not delete the tweet.